Zozulyntsi | Ternopil

Vasyl M., born in 1928: "When the Romanians occupied this bank of the Dniester, border guards forced the Jews from the village and the surrounding area to cross the river.” © Les Kasyanov/Yahad-In Unum. Ivan Sh., born in 1928: “Peilia, wife of Perlei, and Leibykha, wife of Leiba. Both of their husbands died. One lived on this side of the road and the other on the opposite. I believe they were sisters.”. © Les Kasyanov/Yahad-In Unum. Yahad’s team during an interview with a local witness. © Les Kasyanov/Yahad-In Unum. Yahad’s team during an interview with Ivan Sh. near the Dniester River. © Les Kasyanov/Yahad-In Unum. Ivan Sh., born in 1928, points out the location where the Jews were forced to enter the river. © Les Kasyanov/Yahad-In Unum The Dniester River, where dozens of Jews drowned or were killed during a murder operation conducted by the Romanians in late July 1941. © Les Kasyanov/Yahad-In Unum The location where Ivan Sh. saw the bodies of a Jewish woman and her baby. © Les Kasyanov/Yahad-In Unum The Jews were detained here, in the stables, before being taken to the riverbank to be massacred. © Les Kasyanov/Yahad-In Unum Several dozens of Jews from Chernivtsi were drowned in the Dniester River by the Romanians. © Les Kasyanov/Yahad-In Unum

Execution of Jews in Zozulyntsi

2 Sitio(s) de ejecución

Tipo de lugar antes:
Dniester riverbank
Memoriales:
No
Período de ocupación:
1941-1944
Número de víctimas:
Dozen

Entrevista del testigo

Vasyl M., born in 1928: "When the Romanians occupied this bank of the Dniester, border guards forced the Jews from the village and the surrounding area to cross the river. The Jews were loaded onto barks in groups of ten. Then, when they reached the middle of the river, the border guards fired at them. Some were killed by bullets, but others fell or were pushed into the river, where they drowned. Some Jews had to cross the Dniester and were shot when they reached the other bank. Many reached the other bank and managed to hide in the bushes. That is how they survived. I could see everything from my vegetable garden that was just in front of the riverbank.” (Witness n°2304U, interviewed in Chernivtsi, on September 25, 2017)

Nota histórica

Zozulyntsi is located on the bank of the Dniester River in the region of Ternopil. It is 156 km (97 mi) south of Ternopil and 69 km (43 mi) north of Chernivtsi. According to the local witness, there were no Jews in Zozulyntsi before the war. However, several Jewish families lived across the Dniester River in the village of Doroshivtsi. One Jew named Guershko owned a mill, and another mill belonged to a certain Muller. In addition to operating mills, the Jews lived off small-scale trade and handicrafts. There is no information on the number of Jews who lived in Doroshivtsi before the war.

Holocausto por balas en cifras

Zozulyntsi was occupied by the Germans in early July 1941. The villages of Zozulyntsi and Doroshivtsi were located across from each other, with the Dniester River in the middle. When the Soviet Union was occupied by Nazi Germany, Zozulyntsi remained under German occupation, while Doroshivtsi remained under Romanian control. According to the two witnesses interviewed by Yahad, the Jews from Chernivtsi were brought to Doroshivtsi. The Romanians forced them to cross the river. Some were forced to cross it by walking, while others were taken by barks in groups of ten. Once the Jews reached the other bank, the Romanians shot at them, leaving a few dozen dead. About a hundred Jews survived and were placed in the stables. After a while, they were taken in a column to Borschiv, and then to the Podolski camp. According to another witness, YIU/2304U, isolated shootings took place in other villages located upriver because he could see the bodies floating down the river.

Pueblos cercanos

  • Zalischyky
  • Borschiv
Para apoyar el trabajo de Yahad-in Unum por favor considere hacer una donación

¿Tiene información adicional con respecto a un pueblo que le gustaría compartir con Yahad?

Por favor contáctenos a contact@yahadinunum.org
o llamando a Yahad – In Unum at +33 (0) 1 53 20 13 17